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15:27
File ID20190329-008
PublishedMarch 29, 2019 at 07:28 (GMT)
UpdatedMarch 29, 2019 at 14:07 (GMT)
Duration15:27
Aspect Ratio16:9
Caracas, Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of

The Other Venezuela *PARTNER CONTENT*

March 29, 2019 at 07:28 (GMT) · Published

Since opposition politician Juan Guaido appointed himself Venezuela's new president in late January with the full support of Washington and its allies, US government-led attempts to overthrow the Venezuelan governments of first Hugo Chavez and now Nicolas Maduro have intensified.

Washington says its reason for wanting regime-change against the country's Bolivarian revolution is because Maduro is a dictator and the country is engulfed in a humanitarian crisis. This is also largely what the mainstream media are reporting.

While it's clear that the economic and political crisis in Venezuela is real, the mainstream media's version of events looks very different to the one redfish witnessed on the ground. We travelled into the heart of the barrios in the country's capital Caracas to see for ourselves how media coverage measured up to reality

The stakes are high and redfish spoke to those on both sides of the political divide: those radically opposed to the government, who want regime change at any cost, but also voices from Venezuela's grassroots who support the government. It is these voices from the 'other Venezuela' that are normally ignored by the Western media but their message to the US and its allies is loud and clear: respect Venezuela's democracy.

File ID20190329-008
PublishedMarch 29, 2019 at 07:28 (GMT)
UpdatedMarch 29, 2019 at 14:07 (GMT)
Duration15:27
Aspect Ratio16:9
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