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25:27

Iran: The Art of War and Sanctions *PARTNER CONTENT*

Iran, Islamic Republic of, Various
November 22, 2019 at 06:51 GMT +00:00 · Published

The historic Iran nuclear deal didn’t even make it to three years, before Donald Trump withdrew and the U.S. slapped new sanctions on Iran. Inside the country, inflation skyrocketed and sent the economy spiralling.

The new sanctions closed an already defensive Iran from the world, and much of its young population has started looking outwards. Many started asking questions: is Iran being too defensive? Should it change its policies?

redfish investigates what it's like to live under sanctions in Iran.

Professor Mohammad Marandi from the University of Tehran told us: "The art of the sanctions is to create suffering, that’s without a doubt, and that creates long-term disgust and dislike and animosity towards those countries, whether it’s the Americans that promote them and push for them, or the Europeans which obey them, they all are seen as guilty, in the eyes of many Iranians and many people across the region, and people outside the region because this is not something that is unique to Iran, you see it in Latin America, in Northern Africa."

Arman Nahid, whose wife has been suffering from cancer and has been unable to access some of the life-saving medicine she needs: "The American government says 'no, we haven’t sanctioned medicine.' OK, well let’s say if a pharmaceutical company wants to import medicine, how are they supposed to pay? Transferring money is very difficult now, they’ve totally blocked it."

But parliamentarian Abulfadhil Najaf Abadi believes that despite its rhetoric, the U.S. isn't interested in the well-being of Iranians: "When the Americans say to us, you have problems in your country, even if we do, they don’t say it because they have our best interests at heart, they’re saying it for their own national interest, in line with a psychological war, and to endanger our national security."

English and Arabic subtitles are available upon request from Ruptly's Client Desk (cd@ruptly.tv).

25:27
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Description

The historic Iran nuclear deal didn’t even make it to three years, before Donald Trump withdrew and the U.S. slapped new sanctions on Iran. Inside the country, inflation skyrocketed and sent the economy spiralling.

The new sanctions closed an already defensive Iran from the world, and much of its young population has started looking outwards. Many started asking questions: is Iran being too defensive? Should it change its policies?

redfish investigates what it's like to live under sanctions in Iran.

Professor Mohammad Marandi from the University of Tehran told us: "The art of the sanctions is to create suffering, that’s without a doubt, and that creates long-term disgust and dislike and animosity towards those countries, whether it’s the Americans that promote them and push for them, or the Europeans which obey them, they all are seen as guilty, in the eyes of many Iranians and many people across the region, and people outside the region because this is not something that is unique to Iran, you see it in Latin America, in Northern Africa."

Arman Nahid, whose wife has been suffering from cancer and has been unable to access some of the life-saving medicine she needs: "The American government says 'no, we haven’t sanctioned medicine.' OK, well let’s say if a pharmaceutical company wants to import medicine, how are they supposed to pay? Transferring money is very difficult now, they’ve totally blocked it."

But parliamentarian Abulfadhil Najaf Abadi believes that despite its rhetoric, the U.S. isn't interested in the well-being of Iranians: "When the Americans say to us, you have problems in your country, even if we do, they don’t say it because they have our best interests at heart, they’re saying it for their own national interest, in line with a psychological war, and to endanger our national security."

English and Arabic subtitles are available upon request from Ruptly's Client Desk (cd@ruptly.tv).

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