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14:16

Portugal: US base in the Azores linked to inflated cancer rates, environmental damage *EXCLUSIVE*

Португалия, Terceira Island
февраль 21, 2018 в 12:44 GMT +00:00 · Опубликовано

Inhabitants of the Portuguese island of Terceira in the Azores are growing increasingly worried by incidents of cancer and other serious diseases that appear to be afflicting them at higher rates than islanders in the rest of the North Atlantic archipelago. These illnesses are thought to be caused by a series of environmental hazards connected to the US military's decades-long use of the island as an airbase, according to several reports that have begun reaching the public's attention. Home to some 55,000 people, Terceira is one of nine islands belonging to the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic Ocean. Terceira hosts the officially-designated No.4 Lajes airbase, where the United States 65th Air Base Group currently resides under a tenancy agreement. The geographical position of the archipelago, midway between the US and Europe, was considered vital to US military operations in the past, particularly during World War II and the Cold War.Commonly known as the 'Atlantic's airstrip,' the primary mission of the Lajes airbase is to serve as a refuelling post in the middle of the ocean. It is the second largest storage facility outside the USA for the US Air Force after Guam (Micronesia). Lajes is able to provide base and en-route support for medical and mechanical emergency situations for aircraft belonging to the US Department of Defense and NATO, as well as for other commercial or military-authorised aircraft. Over the past few years, a series of environmental hazards linked to pollutants found in the island's soils and aquifers have been connected to activity at the airbase. Several areas are said to have been contaminated by waste, including from massive fuel spills, open air landfills and alleged weapons dumps, and even possible nuclear activity.Norberto Messias, Professor and investigator at the Superior School of Health, showed Ruptly a rock sample which he said points to the "pollution of the Lajes base and the consequences of its presence here." Referring to the rock sample, Messias stated: "this is a sample of residual hydrocarbons, sediments of hydrocarbons. Everything missing here in order to have usable oil is what remained in the soils after the spills and infiltrations."Messias, together with other members of the Department of Mental Health Nursing and Gerontology at the University of Azores, is currently carrying out a study which aims to show the impact of the Lajes airbase on local residents' health, and to establish if there is a definitive link between the contamination and higher rates of illness.Orlando Lima, a former employee at the US base on Terceira, was seen using x-ray and alpha particle detection equipment to analyse the soil at Pico do Careca [Bald Peak], an artificial hill built outside the territory of the US base, where bunkers once stood and where locals claim nuclear activity may have taken place. "The first time we were here, it was everywhere. The soil was dry. We had emissions of alpha particles everywhere," he said. Pico do Careca seems to report an atypical presence of radioactivity in the soil, to which some kind of past nuclear activity appears to be a plausible explanation. Commenting on the quality of the soil on Pico do Careca, Dr. Carlos Lima, a former regional health official and former Mayor of Praia da Vitoria, said, "it is called Pico Careca [Bald Peak] for a reason. I know many farmers who tried to plant something there and nothing was produced." He added: "well, in a land with such fertile soil as ours, where we sow anything and anything grows, I doubt that there wasn't something happening there that burns everything that seeds." The environmental situation in the island was first officially acknowledged in a confidential 2003 report commissioned by the US Air Force. This report, later accessed and published by local newspaper Diario Insular through two unidentified US sources, identifies "30 areas of concern" and explains in detail 17 major fuel spills that occurred at different locations - inside and outside the confines of the base - over the course of many decades. Six of the reported spills were ranked at Level Seven, the highest in a ranking of severity.A US study from 2005, also made public by Diario Insular, identifies 38 separate areas where both soils and aquifers show a high presence of hydrocarbons and heavy metals, including lead and zinc. In response to the report, the Azorean Regional Government commissioned a study to be carried out by the Civil Engineering National Laboratory (LNEC). This investigation, which focused primarily on aquifers and water-quality, has been criticised by locals and experts alike for not analysing a series of key metal substances, for not adjusting its parametric values to the analysed contaminated locations; and for not calling for decontamination as long as certain locations remained unused. Commenting on the report, Azores University professor Felix Rodrigues pointed to what he says is an absence of national laws that deal with soil contamination concerning certain substances. "We don't have legislation to say 'this soil is contaminated.' So we resort to [the relevant legislation of] Canada or the Netherlands," he said. "We have 'only' 50 times more of what is allowed in the most polluted areas of those countries. This is something very worrying," added Rodrigues, who is one of the most active voices on the island in trying to raise awareness of the environmental issues. Incidents of cancer (leukemia and so-called 'rare cancers', such as eye cancer and lung cancer for non-smokers) and other diseases and health issues (including dementia, infertility and cardiac problems) reportedly occur at inflated rates on Terceira in comparison to the other eight Azorean islands. This is especially true of the county of Praia da Vitoria, where the airbase is located. Local records show that although Praia da Vitoria comprises around 8.50 percent of the total Azorean population, the area alone accounts for 30 percent of certain cancers across the archipelago as a whole.Marcos Fagundes, a local resident, gave voice to the idea that a link between contamination on the island and higher local rates of cancer appears likely. "The more cancer cases there are, the more the population asks, why is this happening? Why at Praia da Vitoria are there roads that on one side, all houses have or had at least one case of cancer, and on the other side it's almost every other house. That is not normal," said Fagundes, who is a member of a civic movement that's aiming to take the issue - via petition - to the Portuguese national Parliament, and to demand the immediate decontamination of the island. Madail Avila, a Praia da Vitoria resident who was cured of breast cancer and whose parents both died of cancer, said incidents of the disease in Praia da Vitoria county seem unusually high. "It is a very big coincidence that there are so many cases of cancer within the same family and in the same geographical area as well, as all these cases are geographically located in the same area," she said.US officials declined to give Ruptly a comment on each of the accusations made by locals. In a statement, they said that would not give any further comment on the situation besides those made in a US press release published at the end of the last Portugal-United States bilateral meeting back in December 2017. There, the "current status of environmental issues on Terceira Island with regard to US activities at Lajes Field" is mentioned, with two "priority sites" identified (the Main Gate and South Tank Farm - a major fuel depository). The statement underlines the two countries' intention "to monitor the issues and encourage the technical experts to reach a conclusion on how best to proceed." No measures or conclusions have been made public since the statement was made.Ruptly also contacted the Portuguese government but received no response, however, on 28 February 2018, Portuguese Foreign Minister Augusto Santos Silva made a statement to the Portuguese media claiming that there was an international misinformation campaign over the extent of contamination in the area of the Lajes base in Azores. The Portuguese Foreign Minister added the claim that the campaign was designed to "attack the tourism" on the island.The silence and apparent secrecy surrounding the treatment of the issue by public institutions and government organisations is another reason for the general dissatisfaction and growing alarm. The topic seems to be gaining momentum, as more information arises from reports deemed 'confidential,' and as local citizens, along with a handful of scholars and scientists, promise to continue efforts to shed light on the issues and speed up the restoration of the island.

14:16
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Описание

Inhabitants of the Portuguese island of Terceira in the Azores are growing increasingly worried by incidents of cancer and other serious diseases that appear to be afflicting them at higher rates than islanders in the rest of the North Atlantic archipelago. These illnesses are thought to be caused by a series of environmental hazards connected to the US military's decades-long use of the island as an airbase, according to several reports that have begun reaching the public's attention. Home to some 55,000 people, Terceira is one of nine islands belonging to the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic Ocean. Terceira hosts the officially-designated No.4 Lajes airbase, where the United States 65th Air Base Group currently resides under a tenancy agreement. The geographical position of the archipelago, midway between the US and Europe, was considered vital to US military operations in the past, particularly during World War II and the Cold War.Commonly known as the 'Atlantic's airstrip,' the primary mission of the Lajes airbase is to serve as a refuelling post in the middle of the ocean. It is the second largest storage facility outside the USA for the US Air Force after Guam (Micronesia). Lajes is able to provide base and en-route support for medical and mechanical emergency situations for aircraft belonging to the US Department of Defense and NATO, as well as for other commercial or military-authorised aircraft. Over the past few years, a series of environmental hazards linked to pollutants found in the island's soils and aquifers have been connected to activity at the airbase. Several areas are said to have been contaminated by waste, including from massive fuel spills, open air landfills and alleged weapons dumps, and even possible nuclear activity.Norberto Messias, Professor and investigator at the Superior School of Health, showed Ruptly a rock sample which he said points to the "pollution of the Lajes base and the consequences of its presence here." Referring to the rock sample, Messias stated: "this is a sample of residual hydrocarbons, sediments of hydrocarbons. Everything missing here in order to have usable oil is what remained in the soils after the spills and infiltrations."Messias, together with other members of the Department of Mental Health Nursing and Gerontology at the University of Azores, is currently carrying out a study which aims to show the impact of the Lajes airbase on local residents' health, and to establish if there is a definitive link between the contamination and higher rates of illness.Orlando Lima, a former employee at the US base on Terceira, was seen using x-ray and alpha particle detection equipment to analyse the soil at Pico do Careca [Bald Peak], an artificial hill built outside the territory of the US base, where bunkers once stood and where locals claim nuclear activity may have taken place. "The first time we were here, it was everywhere. The soil was dry. We had emissions of alpha particles everywhere," he said. Pico do Careca seems to report an atypical presence of radioactivity in the soil, to which some kind of past nuclear activity appears to be a plausible explanation. Commenting on the quality of the soil on Pico do Careca, Dr. Carlos Lima, a former regional health official and former Mayor of Praia da Vitoria, said, "it is called Pico Careca [Bald Peak] for a reason. I know many farmers who tried to plant something there and nothing was produced." He added: "well, in a land with such fertile soil as ours, where we sow anything and anything grows, I doubt that there wasn't something happening there that burns everything that seeds." The environmental situation in the island was first officially acknowledged in a confidential 2003 report commissioned by the US Air Force. This report, later accessed and published by local newspaper Diario Insular through two unidentified US sources, identifies "30 areas of concern" and explains in detail 17 major fuel spills that occurred at different locations - inside and outside the confines of the base - over the course of many decades. Six of the reported spills were ranked at Level Seven, the highest in a ranking of severity.A US study from 2005, also made public by Diario Insular, identifies 38 separate areas where both soils and aquifers show a high presence of hydrocarbons and heavy metals, including lead and zinc. In response to the report, the Azorean Regional Government commissioned a study to be carried out by the Civil Engineering National Laboratory (LNEC). This investigation, which focused primarily on aquifers and water-quality, has been criticised by locals and experts alike for not analysing a series of key metal substances, for not adjusting its parametric values to the analysed contaminated locations; and for not calling for decontamination as long as certain locations remained unused. Commenting on the report, Azores University professor Felix Rodrigues pointed to what he says is an absence of national laws that deal with soil contamination concerning certain substances. "We don't have legislation to say 'this soil is contaminated.' So we resort to [the relevant legislation of] Canada or the Netherlands," he said. "We have 'only' 50 times more of what is allowed in the most polluted areas of those countries. This is something very worrying," added Rodrigues, who is one of the most active voices on the island in trying to raise awareness of the environmental issues. Incidents of cancer (leukemia and so-called 'rare cancers', such as eye cancer and lung cancer for non-smokers) and other diseases and health issues (including dementia, infertility and cardiac problems) reportedly occur at inflated rates on Terceira in comparison to the other eight Azorean islands. This is especially true of the county of Praia da Vitoria, where the airbase is located. Local records show that although Praia da Vitoria comprises around 8.50 percent of the total Azorean population, the area alone accounts for 30 percent of certain cancers across the archipelago as a whole.Marcos Fagundes, a local resident, gave voice to the idea that a link between contamination on the island and higher local rates of cancer appears likely. "The more cancer cases there are, the more the population asks, why is this happening? Why at Praia da Vitoria are there roads that on one side, all houses have or had at least one case of cancer, and on the other side it's almost every other house. That is not normal," said Fagundes, who is a member of a civic movement that's aiming to take the issue - via petition - to the Portuguese national Parliament, and to demand the immediate decontamination of the island. Madail Avila, a Praia da Vitoria resident who was cured of breast cancer and whose parents both died of cancer, said incidents of the disease in Praia da Vitoria county seem unusually high. "It is a very big coincidence that there are so many cases of cancer within the same family and in the same geographical area as well, as all these cases are geographically located in the same area," she said.US officials declined to give Ruptly a comment on each of the accusations made by locals. In a statement, they said that would not give any further comment on the situation besides those made in a US press release published at the end of the last Portugal-United States bilateral meeting back in December 2017. There, the "current status of environmental issues on Terceira Island with regard to US activities at Lajes Field" is mentioned, with two "priority sites" identified (the Main Gate and South Tank Farm - a major fuel depository). The statement underlines the two countries' intention "to monitor the issues and encourage the technical experts to reach a conclusion on how best to proceed." No measures or conclusions have been made public since the statement was made.Ruptly also contacted the Portuguese government but received no response, however, on 28 February 2018, Portuguese Foreign Minister Augusto Santos Silva made a statement to the Portuguese media claiming that there was an international misinformation campaign over the extent of contamination in the area of the Lajes base in Azores. The Portuguese Foreign Minister added the claim that the campaign was designed to "attack the tourism" on the island.The silence and apparent secrecy surrounding the treatment of the issue by public institutions and government organisations is another reason for the general dissatisfaction and growing alarm. The topic seems to be gaining momentum, as more information arises from reports deemed 'confidential,' and as local citizens, along with a handful of scholars and scientists, promise to continue efforts to shed light on the issues and speed up the restoration of the island.

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